Secrets of a Public Adjuster: What Really Happens After A Major Disaster?

Secrets of a Public Adjuster: What Really Happens After A Major Disaster?

Insurance companies are under tremendous pressure to respond to a claim as soon as possible. However, they have reduced the number of their property adjusters in recent years, and when a major calamity occurs such as  Hurricane Florence, they have to bring in adjusters from out-of-state to write an estimate for the cost of the repairs.

The technical term for these adjusters is “Cat Adjusters,” which is short for “Catastrophe Adjusters.” These Cat Adjusters wait for a widespread disaster to hit, such as hurricanes. They then work very hard for a few months and then move on to the next disaster, wherever it may be.

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7 Steps You Should Take To Avoid Water Damage Claims

7 Steps You Should Take To Avoid Water Damage Claims

So often we’re brought into insurance claims that could have been avoided if the property owner knew what to look for before the damage occurred. As a licensed Public Adjuster, I see this all the time. In addition to being a Public Adjuster, I am also a certified Water Remediation Specialist. Below, I offer you—the property owner—seven steps to help you avoid a water damage loss to your property and possessions.

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Time Is Running Out To File Ice Dam Insurance Claims

Time Is Running Out To File Ice Dam Insurance Claims

Leonard Theran, President of New England’s oldest and largest public adjusting firm (representing property owners who have insurance claims) is urging insurance companies to address lingering issues that are a result of the winter of 2015’s record snow and ice event. The winter of 2015 entered the record books as one of the most severe winters in the Northeast, with more than $2.4 billion in insurance claims filed as a result of the unprecedented 110+ inches of snowfall to the region. Ice dams accounted for the majority of the losses.

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Never Settle For Less: Ice Dams and Water Damage

Never Settle For Less: Ice Dams and Water Damage

When Brian Lannery was called to his customer’s Newton Center, Massachusetts, home last February, he crossed paths with the homeowners’ insurance adjuster who was there to inspect water damage to the home as a result of an ice dam. Lannery, owner of Bourke Painting, a Newton-based contractor specializing in fine residential house painting, renovation and repair, was shocked at the short amount of time the adjuster spent inspecting the damage.

“He was only there briefly. His inspection was not very thorough,” noted Lannery. A short time later, the insurance company offered the homeowners a settlement for the damage—a ridiculously low figure according to Lannery.

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Hidden Coverages Increase Insurance Payouts in Maine

Hidden Coverages Increase Insurance Payouts in Maine

When was the last time you read your insurance policy? Terms like “stretch coverage,” “actual cash value,” “recoverable depreciation” or “Ordinance and Law” can mean very little to the average person, but can mean a lot in terms of sizable out-of-pocket expenses or money left on the table to an insured facing a building loss. The last thing anyone needs is the added pressure of becoming an expert on insurance terminology when faced with a loss.

Having a Public Adjuster on your side of the table who is as well-versed in the language of insurance policies as the insurance companies (and their adjusters) levels the playing field in any discussion. PLA’s Public Adjusters meticulously document each claim as they review each policy line-by-line to uncover hidden coverages to increase payouts for our clients.

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The Good News And The Bad News

The Good News And The Bad News

Here, at Professional Loss Adjusters, we are still fighting for homeowners and business owners who suffered property damage in last year's epic ice and snow storms. Insurance companies have been slow to settle and, in many cases, have undervalued the damage. With this in mind, we can never stress enough how important it is to contact us immediately upon discovering a disaster.

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Going The Extra 2,400 Miles To Adjust An Insurance Loss

Going The Extra 2,400 Miles To Adjust An Insurance Loss

A number of companies offer to go the “extra mile” on behalf of their clients. However, not many offer to go the extra 2,400 miles, as we did on a recent insurance claim. When floods destroyed our client’s main manufacturing plant in Rhode Island, all the equipment was shut down and was in the process of being moved to protect the property from further damage. Consequently, we could not get a good understanding of how each machine worked and of the overall manufacturing process.

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10 Things To Do After A Fire or Flood

10 Things To Do After A Fire or Flood

You have just suffered an emotionally upsetting loss to your property—maybe a fire, a flood, wind damage, water damage or another type of disaster. Large or small, you now face the task of preparing and submitting a detailed claim to your insurance carrier, not only because you need to be compensated for your losses, but because it is required by your insurance policy.

For most people, the preparation of an insurance claim is unfamiliar and rough terrain. What does your policy actual cover? Do you understand the legal terminology and implications within the policy? What does “extended broad form property damage liability” mean? How about “water exclusion endorsement”? What is “business interruption insurance”? What does your policy not cover? At times, the list of questions seems endless, but remember, it is your responsibility to prepare and prove your claim to the insurance company, or your claim will be reduced, or worse...denied.

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Extreme Storms and Property Damage Are On The Rise. Here's Why.

Extreme Storms and Property Damage Are On The Rise. Here's Why.

Regardless of whether global warming is or is not the cause of climate change and the recent extremes in weather we have experienced, one thing is for sure: we can expect to see heavier rainfall, heavier snowfall, an increase in the number of severe storms and a greater potential for property damage. Several reports have been released over the past few years that outline the trend toward more severe weather.

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